Wednesday, January 13, 2010

A new perspective

This is an inspiring email sent by one of our cardmakers....hope it gives everyone the warm fuzzies that it gave me! —Sandy

I wanted to share with you a short story that really drove home to me what soldiers and their families must go through and why it is so important to me to make cards for "Operation Write Home."

One of our son-in-laws (we have 2) was recently hired by our local county Sheriff's Dept. as a deputy.  He's excited and we're all thrilled.  He left yesterday for 3 months of training at the Illinois State Police Academy located about 1 1/2 hrs. from our home.  The "trainees" are not allowed to use their cell phones or computers while at "boot camp".  They were allowed to bring paper, pencil, envelope and stamps to write home.  He does get to come home Friday nights and stay until Sunday mornings, then back again.  In talking with our daughter yesterday after he left, she was of course sad that he was gone - even though she fully supports what her husband is doing.  The thing she said she hated the most was that she wouldn't be able to talk to her husband until Friday.

After we hung up the phone I really got thinking about that.  I can't imagine not talking to my husband for 5 days and we've been married 30 years.  I tried hard to imagine having a spouse, child, parent, etc. overseas in the service.  My mind just really couldn't get around it.  I thought about how terribly important it would be to me to receive communication of any kind, especially written.  For me personally I think that having a card in my hand, picked out, handwritten and as weird as this sounds - something my husband had touched would be so special and make me feel a little closer to him.

I think I have thought about this in a more abstract way before.  The only person in my family to have ever served in the Armed Forces was my Grandpa during WWII and I wasn't even born yet.  This experience really brought home to me how very important the work that you and so many others do is.

I am so proud and grateful to be able to have the opportunity to help a soldier communicate with those they love.

Thanks for taking time to read this little note and a huge thank you for the gift you give to so very many people.

Humbly and fondly,
Kim Nelson

8 comments:

Rhonda Miller said...

Thanks for sharing. It does put new perspective on why we are making and sending these cards to our heros.

Lorie said...

I have actually experienced both of these situations...a deployed husband and then when he went to BLEA and that is tough, not being able to talk with your loved one for days on end...for everyone.

I'm glad that I've finally participated in this project and I hope to have many more boxes of cards to send to the soldiers!

Cyn said...

Thanks for sharing ..and I agree! When I don't hear from my hubby all day, and I feel sad...I will stop and think how lucky I am compared to the military families that don't see their loved ones for months or more! I am so Thankful for all they do..it makes making cards so special to me.

Paula said...

Beautifully put Kim. I agree that its worth taking the time to reflect on the many and deep sacrifices those in the military make for all of us, and you letter has helped many of us do just that.

Dixie said...

Well said, Kim.

Kajikit said...

One of the reasons I decided it would be a good idea to make cards for OWH was because my husband and I had a long-distance relationship, and we were living on opposite sides of the world for almost five years before we got married. He's not a big letter-writer, but the few notes and cards that he sent me were ultra-precious - and that was when we were talking on the phone for hours twice a day every day! He's away on a business trip this week and I can't talk to him until the evening because he's working, and it's reminded me again how much you miss your loved one when they're not there! And my Love will be home at the end of the week...

Cathy said...

Thank you for sharing this story. The closest I've ever come to this is when my husband went on a mission trip to a very remote area in Nicaragua. Not being able to hear his voice for several days was awful. I couldn't imagine what the men and women in our armed forces go through for months at a time.

Seongsook Duncan said...

Thanks for sharing your story and writing this note for others. I like to share it with my card making group at work. It will remind them how very important the work that they do.